What are Containers?

Docker started out in 2012 as an open source project, originally named dotcloud, to build single-application Linux containers. Since then, Docker has become an immensely popular development tool, increasingly used as a runtime environment. Few -- if any -- technologies have caught on with developers as quickly as Docker.

One reason Docker is so popular is that it delivers the promise of “develop once, run anywhere.” Docker offers a simple way to package an application and its runtime dependencies into a single container; it also provides a runtime abstraction that enables the container to run across different versions of the Linux kernel.

Using Docker, a developer can make a containerized application on his or her workstation, then easily deploy the container to any Docker-enabled server. There’s no need to retest or retune the container for the server environment, whether in the cloud or on premises.

In addition, Docker provides a software sharing and distribution mechanism that allows developers and operations teams to easily share and reuse container content. This distribution mechanism, coupled with portability across machines, helps account for Docker’s popularity with operations teams and with developers.

Docker components

Docker is both a development tool and a runtime environment. To understand Docker, we must first understand the concept of a Docker container image. A container always starts with an image and is considered an instantiation of that image. An image is a static specification of what the container should be in runtime, including the application code inside the container and runtime configuration settings. Docker images contain read-only layers, which means that once an image is created it is never modified.